Archive for Interesting

Dispatch from the NSS: Things to look forward to.

Rhodia white ice

There were several new products on display in the Exaclair booth at the National Stationery Show that I had the opportunity to drool over today, including the new “pictures can’t do them justice” Rhodia Ice. They look AMAZING in person. Continue Readering »

Exaclair at the National Stationery Show in NYC May 18-21st

NSS Postcard

If you are a retailer or a journalist, please be sure to visit the Exaclair booth # 2347 at the National Stationery Show – held at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City May 18th through May 21st.

The is the first time the new white covered Rhodia Ice notepads will be making their debut in the US and from what we’ve been hearing, there seem to be quite a few of you looking forward to buying them! Have a favorite Rhodia Retailer? Send them a note asking them to stock up on Ice for the summer!

Have you ever tried black paper?

Clairefontaine black paper

We recently received an e-mail from a Rhodia fan requesting black paper with light grey dots. Is this something you would be interested in? I know I would. I’ve been using black paper for years… 

Once I fell in love with black paper (mostly for art making) I became obsessed with finding the most opaque media to use in combination with it. White gel pens are good, as are grease pencils, (aka China Markers) some colored pencils, gouache watercolor paint, acrylic paint, and one of my favorites, the highly pigmented Neocolor artist crayons by Caran D’Ache. 

I’ve tried a lot of different kinds of black paper and most of what I’ve used would fall under the category of art papers. (Colored papers are a particular favorite for pastel artists.)  Most common are construction type papers which are thin, tear easily and not always fade resistant, smooth card stock type papers, and the laid (textured) papers typically used with pastel.

If you can’t find a black papered notebook or one that you like, you can make your own book using loose sheets of your favorite black art paper. Another option would be to apply black gesso (an acrylic based paint primer) to your favorite white papered sketchbooks – a time consuming, expensive & messy process that creates a pretty amazing surface to work on.

Rhodia Cover Doodles: What does yours look like?

cover doodle

Rhodia fan Chris sent us this cover doodle with the suggestion that our logo should look like this. What do you think? I like it! Now I’m just trying to figure out what mountain this might be…

Mont_Blanc

Perhaps Mont Blanc in the French Alps?

I’ll be adding Chris’s image to our Cover Doodle Fan Photo page. Have an image you’d like to share with us? Send it to me: Stephanie at RhodiaDrive dot com.

The Ultimate Dinner Party: Who would you invite?

my_name_pesca

If you could have dinner with any five LIVING famous people, who would you invite? Would you want to laugh? Hear about travels from around the world? Talk about food? Music? Politics? My list would include Anthony Bourdain, Stephen King, Augusten Burroughs, Byron Metcalf and Tony Robbins.

The best part of this game is Googling everyone else’s answers. List your responses in the comment box below -

Image courtesy of my_name_pesca on Instagram

Your Rhodia Images: Instagram and Etcetera.

yogalarva 1

Your Rhodia images are a big part of this blog and for the last year or so, I’ve found many amazing photos of our products through Instagram. We only ever use them after receiving your permission to do so and lately, I’ve been experiencing a glitch which has resulted in many of my comments being deleted. It is possible that Instagram sees my comments as “spammy” since I am including the http://rhodiadrive.com address when requesting use of the images.

Until I can get that issue straightened out, please feel free to send any images that you’d like me to consider for use to stephanie at rhodiadrive dot com. Please note in the subject line whether or not you prefer your submission to be used specifically on one of our Fan Photo Pages, or if we can use it on the blog and/or our Rhodia Drive Facebook page. Please also include your name so we can properly attribute the image to you.

Today’s images courtesy of yogalarva on Instagram.

yogalarva

Rhodia and the BIC Cristal ballpoint pen: A historic pair?

Rhodia with Bic Crystal Pen

In 1945, Marcel Bich and his partner Edouard Buffard began manufacturing fountain pens and mechanical pencil parts in Clichy, France. In 1950, Marcel Bich launched the BIC Cristal ballpoint pen. BIC is a shortened version of his own name.

Since Rhodia tablets and BIC Cristal pens each existed in France in 1950, what do you think the odds are that there were people using them together at that time?

Link Share Friday: April Edition

my_name_pesca

Gratitude Journaling (by Kathy Paper Pumpkin) at Art Journaling

Monami Handy Highlighter at A Penchant for Paper

More about Pencil Tourism at The Well-Appointed Desk

Pilot Kaküno Fountain Pen Review at Write to Me Often

A Ferrule to Arms: Erasable #2 at Pencil Revolution

Weekly Loadout Submission – Alia L. at Ed Jelley

20 Creative Writing Careers at Writing Forward

The Handwritten Note at Daily Writing Tips

New Habana Notebook Cover Colors at Quo Vadis Blog

Journaling As Healing Process at Create Write Now with Mari

Guide to Choosing a Pair of Scissors at JetPens Blog

10 of the Most Controversial Productivity Tips That Actually Work at Buffer

Journaling Exercise: Question of Faith at Kaizen Journaling

The Library: A World History Presents a Stunning Visual Survey of The World’s Great Libraries at Open Culture

Office Size Clam Paper clipper at My Supply Room

Faber Castell 9000 HB pencils vintage matchboxes spotlight at Lung Sketching Scrolls

Montblanc Meisterstuck : The Masterpiece at Pen Boutique Blog

Featured Pen – Kaweco AL Sport – Stonewashed Black at Pens Paper Ink… Whatever!

Smooth As A Baby’s Bottom – Or Not at The Pen Addict

Image courtesy of my_name_pesca on Instagram.

Illustrations by Kai Lützenkirchen

kailutzen 2

These animal drawings are by Kai Lützenkirchen and were drawn with a Kaweco fountain pen in a Rhodia notebook. Aren’t these meerkats adorable? Kai’s Instagram feed kailutzen is filled with all kinds of wonderful illustrations like these.

Kailutzen 1

Have you heard? The bird is the word…

Images courtesy of Kai.

Weaving a 4 Strand Braid

image

About a hundred years ago, after much teasing from my two older cousins that I couldn’t make a simple braid, my great aunt Evelyn sat me down on her bed with a bag of shoestring licorice and proceeded to teach me how to make a three strand braid. (Which I got to eat once completed.) 

While I never held much interest in knitting or crocheting, I do enjoy using different weaving techniques like braiding, twining and knotless netting in my mixed media art projects and can never walk past a yarn shop without going in. Yesterday I happened upon the gigantic sale tables of yarn at a local store called Conversational Threads in Emmaus, PA where I bought myself several skeins of pretty colors that I thought I might eventually use when I make dream catchers.

After balling up the yarn this afternoon, I was curious how these three colors might look braided together. I decided that I wanted to do a 4 strand braid but needed a refresher – so I looked to YouTube for assistance and found the following video:

This isn’t the way I remembered making them but I thought I’d give it a try and was pleasantly surprised with the results.

4 strand braid

This was made with a total of 12 strands loosely woven which resulted in the braid being flat and wide. While this was only an experiment, a braid like this could be used as a simple wrapped bracelet, necklace, belt, headband…

For all of the Dad’s out there – you’ll win super mega bonus points with your little girls if you learn to braid their hair like this.

Waiting to get your paws on a landscape Webbie?

hotdogsandwiches

The landscape version of our beloved Webbie (Webnotebook) will soon be available in the US and we are hoping that you are as excited about it as we are. Will you share with us how this format may work more efficiently for your needs?

• Size A5: 5 1⁄2” x 8 1⁄4”
• 90 g ivory paper, acid-free, pH neutral, 96 sheets
• Embossed Rhodia logo
• Elastic closure matching color cover (orange and black)
• Round corners
• Individually shrink-wrapped
• Lined or blank
• Inner pocket in back cover

Image courtesy of hotdogsandwiches on Instagram

 

Retailer Spotlight – Anderson Pens

真紅のステージ カーテン STAGE CURTAIN VECTOR イラスト素材

This week on our Retailer Spotlight we have the lovely duo from Anderson Pens, Lisa and Brian Anderson! For our readers who do not know about Anderson Pens here’s a bit of background from their website and e-store www.andersonpens.net:

“Established in 2010, AndersonPens.net was developed to combine the efforts of Brian Anderson’s Esterbrook.net, and Lisa Anderson’s ProperPads to bring pens and paper together all in one place.”

They have become big enough to successfully open a brand new retail location in Appleton, WI which if you’re in the area you definitely need to check out! Continue Readering »

Dialog Writing in Your Memoirs

220px-Stephen_tobolowsky_2012

When I first bought character actor Stephen Tobolowsky’s book “The Dangerous Animals Club” I didn’t initially realize that it was a memoir. (If you don’t know Stephen’s name, you probably know his face because he’s been in over 200 movies – from Mississippi Burning to Memento.) Each chapter is a separate story, (some quite amusing) yet there are larger interconnecting narratives that weave together from the book’s beginning to end. From the very first chapter I instantly recognized Stephen as a gifted storyteller and was more than happy to read about his various experiences -including many from his 30 years in the entertainment industry.

When reading a book such as this, I’m always intrigued by the authors ability to either recall or write detailed dialog. I have a million stories I could write about, but how does one remember exactly what so and so said? If one does not have the memory of an elephant and did not take explicitly detailed notes at the time of the event, does the author simply use artistic license and make things up? I’d be concerned that I’d receive a phone call from Great Aunt Hilde screaming at me something along the lines of, “I never said that you should buy the tuna, It’s always been the cod!”

If you’ve ever penned a short story using actual events from your life, how did you go about writing the character dialog? If not, we can each check out the advice offered at the links below.

Can You Make Up Dialogue In Memoirs Or Nonfiction Books? at Writer’s Relief

Writing a Memoir Like a Novel: Dialogue at This New Mountain

 

Looking for Calligraphic Inspiration?

Biffybeans Calligraphy Folded Pen

I received an e-mail the other day from Roy M. asking if I knew of any good calligraphy blogs. As I did not, I began to Google around. I found sites which featured eye candy like Gentian Osman’s at Drawing with a Squirrel, Schin Loong’s at Open Ink Stand, and Eliza Holliday’s at  The Letterist.

Molly Suber Thorpe at Plurabelle Calligraphy has written a book entitled Modern Calligraphy and offers physical workshops. Molly Lever at  Art du Jour offers online workshops.

A Place to Flourish offers the anticipations, experiences and reflections of a calligrapher.

But I really seemed to have struck the mother load when I found this post: 40 Fantastic Calligraphy Blogs which has links from calligraphy artists around the world  - many who are are largely influenced by the cultures in which they live and work.

Does anyone else know of any good calligraphy blogs?

The image above is my own. That’s Rouge Hematite in a handmade folded pen.

 

Are you Familiar with Commonplace Books? Why not start one today!

Commonplace_book_mid_17th_century

Commonplace books (or commonplaces) are essentially handwritten scrapbooks filled with items of every kind: recipes, quotes, letters, poems, tables of weights and measures, proverbs, prayers, legal formulas, etc.

These commonplaces were used by readers, writers, students, and scholars as an aid for remembering useful concepts, or facts they had learned and each book would be unique to its owners particular interests. They became significant in early modern Europe.

Per Wiki, commonplace books are not diaries nor travelogues, with which they can be contrasted: English Enlightenment philosopher John Locke wrote the 1706 book A New Method of Making a Common Place Book, “in which techniques for entering proverbs, quotations, ideas, speeches were formulated. Locke gave specific advice on how to arrange material by subject and category, using such key topics as love, politics, or religion. Commonplace books, it must be stressed, are not journals, which are chronological and introspective.” – Nicholas A. Basbanes in “Every Book Its Reader: The Power of the Printed Word to Stir the World”

And in the words of Jonathan Swift: “A common-place book is what a provident poet cannot subsist without, for this proverbial reason, that “great wits have short memories;” and whereas, on the other hand, poets being liars by profession, ought to have good memories. To reconcile these, a book of this sort is in the nature of a supplemental memory; or a record of what occurs remarkable in every day’s reading or conversation. There you enter not only your own original thoughts, (which, a hundred to one, are few and insignificant) but such of other men as you think fit to make your own by entering them there. For take this for a rule, when an author is in your books, you have the same demand upon him for his wit, as a merchant has for your money, when you are in his.” —from “A Letter of Advice to a Young Poet”

Would you like to read more about commonplace books? Try these links:

How And Why To Keep A “Commonplace Book” at ThoughtCatalog

Commonplace Books at Harvard University Library

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David Allen of GTD on Rhodia

David Allen is a productivity consultant who is best known as the creator of the time management method known as “Getting Things Done”. David comments on the Rhodia Meeting Book: “I love this Rhodia pad. First, the paper stands... Read on »

Chef Hosea Rosenberg on Rhodia

Season 5 (Bravo Network) Top Chef Hosea Rosenberg, originally from Taos, New Mexico, was always good at math. After graduating 3rd in his class at Taos High School, he moved to Boulder, CO to study at the University of Colorado. His dream... Read on »

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About

Rhodia Drive is a blog about Rhodia notebooks and the people who use them. It’s a place where devotees of this “French orange notebook” contribute ideas, experiences and links on the latest tools, events and general notebook-related news.

Rhodia Drive attracts creative people passionate about their Rhodia. Designers and artists, writers and pen collectors, thinkers and free spirits—anyone who loves notebooks—come together on Rhodia Drive.